Links for Today

Links for today:

  • Intranet 2.0 in 10 Not-Seasy-Steps [Link]
  • Styleneat, a simple CSS Organizer [Link]
  • Very funny: Intranet 2.0 from a Manager’s perspective (German only, sorry) [Link]
  • SharePoint: How to make a multiple lines of text field collapse and expand [Link]

Interviews in Intranet Needs Analysis

On a related note to my post from yesterday, Step Two Designs has a short overview on how to use an established qualitative approach from the Social sciences, more precisely interviews, when conducting an intranet needs analysis.

Intranet and Enterprise 2.0 ROI

There seems to be quite an ongoing discussion about the ROI of Enterprise 2.0 applications, which typically range from trying to define exactly what Enterprise 2.0 is and, more important, how to measure and rate its value. Especially the latter is complicated, because we are dealing with a mixture of financial and technical changes coupled with more ’soft‘ changes that relate more to the social structure and communications formations of the enterprise than to hard and easy measurable facts.

I have recently pointed out that a solution would be to establish a set of sociological approaches, and i am not alone with this opinion – over on the ThoughtFarmer blog there is an interesting article that integrates some elements from network theory in a proposal of how to measure the value of an emerging Enterprise 2.0 landscape.

Local/Global Intranets, Intranet Review Toolkit

Links for today:

  • Principles for designing global/local Intranets [Link]
  • I have used it before, but never mentioned it here: The Intranet Review Toolkit by Step Two Designs. Although it contains nothing that professional intranet communicators wouldn’t know already, I would definitely recommend this to organizations where non-communicators are appointed with communication & Intranet tasks [Link]

Sunday Links

Sunday links:

  • Google News Timeline [Link]
  • Edgar Allan Poe and the Economy of Horror [Link]
  • MIT Media Studies Podcast: X-Men World Building [Link]
  • Why Tech Support Sucks [Link]

SharePoint Charting made (too) easy

EndUserSharePoint.com has a lightweight and easy charting implementation for SharePoint. It has only one fault: it transfers data to a Google API before rendering the graph. Couple this with the wide-ranging – and often justified – information security paranoia within corporations and you’re opening a whole new can of worms. But, I have to admit, it is a really cool idea and I think that many SharePoint users stuck without Exel Services or behind restricted installations are grinding their teeth now.

Intranet Case Studies

Just stumbled upon this handy list of Intranet Case Studies which sports quite a few big names. Although some are too vague in their presentation to really get an understanding of the described Intranet, there is still a lot of useful information, not to mention inspiration, that can be found there.

SharePoint List Migration

Ever wondered how to move your lists or libraries across various SharePoint sites or installations? Well, I often have, and therefore found this compilation of SharePoint List Migration Approaches very helpful. Although, I might add, none of these approaches should be undertaken by an inexperienced user.

Bitrix, Wikis, and Quality Management

Links for today:

  • Products to watch: Bitrix Intranet Portal [Link]
  • A comparison of five free wiki systems (German) [Link]
  • Using a Wiki to implement Quality Management [Link, via]

A Quality Metric for Enterprise 2.0?

Again, I have to come back to what I have written about the ROI of Enterprise 2.0 applications. Here and here I phrased an idea of using sociological tool sets to grasp the outcomes and possible benefits of using blogs, wikis, social software, and other so-called Web 2.0 apps in organizations. Granted, the main organizational form in Germany is very rigid and hierarchical, and might pose quite an obstacle to overcome in this regard, so I really dig this outline of a quality metric for Enterprise 2.0 that was posted on the blog of Ethan Yarbrough. It’s more a rough sketch and by no means a detailed strategy yet, but it neatly incorporates a mix of quantitative and qualitative measures, which can yield, as I have said before, reliable and valid results.