Alan Moore’s Levitz Grid for all 12 issues of Big Numbers

Alan Moore’s Levitz Grid for all 12 issues of Big Numbers, continued on the n…

Alan Moore’s Levitz Grid for all 12 issues of Big Numbers, continued on the next double page spread! Illustration from „Alan Moore: Storyteller“ by Gary Spencer Millidge.

The Levitz Grid

Paul Levitz probably thought about what a comic book writer does more than any of his contemporaries, or mine, and during his dozen-plus-years stint as writer of The Legion of Super-Heroes, systematized what his predecessors did haphazardly, if at all. Then, as an aid to his own work, he created three versions of the Levitz Grid [] Basically, the procedure is this: The writer has two, three, or even four plots going at once. The main plot—call it Plot A—occupies most of the pages and the characters‘ energies. The secondary plot—Plot B—functions as a subplot. Plot C and Plot D, if any, are given minimum space and attention—a few panels. As Plot A concludes, Plot B is „promoted“; it becomes Plot A, and Plot C becomes Plot B, and so forth. Thus, there is a constant upward plot progression; each plot develops in interest and complexity as the year’s issues appear.

Quelle: Serious comics writing post: how can teh Internet be so jam packed with my fe…

Additionally check out The Levitz Paradigm: „The best imitation of life possible in a work of fiction“

Parting Shot: Jonathan Hickman’s Graphtacular ‘Fantastic Four’ Outline

Parting Shot: Jonathan Hickman’s Graphtacular ‘Fantastic Four’ Outline

[T]he various plotlines as they progress through 30 issues of Fantastic Four.

I, Reboot (Part II) | Antenna

Of course, rebooting can never truly wipe the slate clean. The slate is a palimpsest and contains all the traces and ghosts of previous incarnations. However, we can see (hypothetically) intertextuality and dialogism spiralling along a horizontal axis – the paradigmatic – and the story itself unfolding sequentially along a vertical axis which is the syntagm. Intertextuality may “destroy the linearity of the text,” as Laurent Jenny argues, but linearity is still preserved.

I, Reboot (Part II) | Antenna

Alan Moore on Superheroes

The subject of comic-related-films (or film-related-comics) had understandably arisen and, when asked, I had ventured my honest opinion that I found something worrying about the fact that the superhero film audience was now almost entirely composed of adults, men and women in their thirties, forties and fifties who were eagerly lining up to watch characters and situations that had been expressly created to entertain the twelve year-old boys of fifty years ago. […] It looks to me very much like a significant section of the public, having given up on attempting to understand the reality they are actually living in, have instead reasoned that they might at least be able to comprehend the sprawling, meaningless, but at-least-still-finite ‘universes’ presented by DC or Marvel Comics. I would also observe that it is, potentially, culturally catastrophic to have the ephemera of a previous century squatting possessively on the cultural stage and refusing to allow this surely unprecedented era to develop a culture of its own, relevant and sufficient to its times.

Last Alan Moore Interview? | Pádraig Ó Méalóid AKA Slovobooks

Comics and the City: An Interview with Jorn Ahrens

The city as social realm strongly refers to communication via images. Comics help turning these images into cultural narratives and aesthetics and to create outstanding icons of modern identity, landmarks of our self-understanding that are, by definition, not bound to specific cities or nations.

via Confessions of an Aca/Fan: Archives: Comics and the City: An Interview with Jorn Ahrens.