Sending Custom Actionable Messages via Flow

Sending Custom Actionable Messages via Flow

Actionable Messages is a way that we can send a small bit of JSON within an email message, it gets picked up by Outlook (Web, App, Desktop, Mobile) and parsed as quick actions, or a way to collect additional information. We can easily create Actionable Messages with Microsoft Flow

MP3 to WAV via ffmpeg.exe in AzureFunctions, for PowerApps and Flow

MP3 to WAV via ffmpeg.exe in AzureFunctions, for PowerApps and Flow

  • PowerApps Microphone control records MP3 files
  • Cognitive Speech to Text wants to turn WAV files into JSON
  • Even with Flow, we can’t convert the audio file formats.
  • We need an Azure Function to gluethis one step
  • After a bit of research, it looks like FFMPEG, a popular free utility can be used to do the conversion

Generate Any PDF Documents from HTML with Flow

Generate Any PDF Documents from HTML with Flow

This is a crazy one, and if you have read ALL my Microsoft Flow blog posts, you’ll be familiar with all these pieces. We are going to connect them a different way though, and the result is still awesome.

Provisioning an Office 365 group with an approval flow and Azure functions

blog.atwork.at | Provisioning an Office 365 group with an approval flow and Azure functions

In real world environments, organizations usually want to restrict the group provisioning so that IT can control the wild growth of groups. This article series shows how to create an Office 365 group with an attached approval process with SharePoint Online, Flow and Azure functions. See how this works here!

Flow (Still) Matters

Perhaps because of technological convergence through DVRs and TiVo, television fragmentation, and the so-called post-network era, for many television scholars working on “important” texts – most often masculinized shows that air in primetime – flow has become passé, bygone, and moved beyond in television studies. Choosing not to engage with the (super)text and focusing only on the narrative elements of a show makes for concerning, unremarked-upon assumptions about “quality” audiences and spectatorship practices with strong implications for erasures of class and gender beyond what I can cover here. But flow is, of course, alive and well and even, as I’ll argue, desired. Moreover, it’s not only characteristic of network broadcasting (especially in daytime), but cable and non-network spaces are themselves begging for ‘flownalyses.’ For instance, I’m an avid viewer of Logo’s #sitcomtherapy nights, which air old episodes of queer-friendly sitcoms like The Golden Girls and Roseanne, punctuated by bumpers showing gay men and couples, PSAs by gay puppets educating audiences about AIDS, and programs for queer shows with queer bodies like RuPaul’s Drag Race, all the while overlaid by Tweets, hashtags, and queer trivia.

Taylor Cole Miller | Flow (Still) Matters | Antenna.