Open (World) Peer Review: Leveling a Lowbie PhD Thesis

Video game archaeology perhaps is the first example of a new New Archaeology, one that is post-material and post-human, one that not only intersects past and present, but that also uses the screen as the sole method of accessing new archaeological spaces. These spaces are made by people (or by machine) for other people to use, and are invested with creativity and examples of material culture. They are kinetic and also kinesthetic. They contain their own space-time. Each game is its own discrete entity, its own site. At the same time, each game exists in multiple, identical copies, circumventing the problem of the “unrepeatable experiment” of total excavation. They pose both classic and new questions to the archaeologist who operates in both the real and the virtual simultaneously using very real archaeological craft.

Andrew Reinhard, Open (World) Peer Review: Leveling a Lowbie PhD Thesis | Archaeogaming

How fantastical Atari box art taught the world what makes video games special · Art of the Game

The graphics were simple and borderline abstract, but they were also an experience unlike anything most households had ever seen. The box art was meant to coalesce that excitement into something tangible. A static screenshot from the game couldn’t possibly relate how dynamic the experience was to a neophyte audience. The impressionistic nature of the 2600’s graphics also allowed for ample interpretation of what that experience would resemble.

How fantastical Atari box art taught the world what makes video games special, Nick Wisnerski

Maniac Mansion Design Notes

A early mock-up of the Maniac Mansion UI, which would influence many later Lucasfilm adventure games.

A map of the mansion, interestingly the limited disk space of 320k played a big role in the mansion size and layout.

Source: Grumpy Gamer – Maniac Mansion Design Notes