Comparative Narrative Story Structures Charted!

story-structures

Comparative Narrative Story Structures Charted!.

Lots of people have come up with lots of ways to map, chart, categorize, name and formulate story patterns and structures. Also see The Story Structure Countdown: How Different ‘Experts’ Say You Should Structure a Story.

TMH5, Panel Three: Second Screens, Connected Viewing, Crowd-funding and Social Media: Re-imagining Television Consumption on Vimeo

TMH5, Panel Three: Second Screens, Connected Viewing, Crowd-funding and Social Media: Re-imagining Television Consumption on Vimeo on Vimeo

As the television industry has been remapping the flow of media content, as new forms of producers and distributors enter the marketplace, there has also been an accompanying effort to rethink their interface with media audiences. Over the past decade, we’ve seen a renewed emphasis on audience engagement strategies which seek to ensure consumer loyalty and social buzz as a way for individual programs or networks to “break through the clutter” of the multiplying array of media options. New metrics are emerging for measuring the value of engaged viewers and the kinds of social and cultural capital they bring with them when they embrace a program. So, for example, the rise of Black Twitter has been credited with helping to rally support behind new programs with strong black protagonists, such as ABC’s “Scandal,” Fox’s “Sleepy Hollow” and BET’s “Being Mary Jane.” Second-screen apps are becoming ubiquitous as television producers seek to hold onto the attention of a generation of viewers who are prone to multitasking impulses. The successful “Veronica Mars” Kickstarter campaign opens up the prospect of fans helping to provide funding in support of their favorite stars, creators or series. And the commercial success of “50 Shades of Grey,” which was adapted from a piece of “Twilight” fan fiction, has alerted the publishing world to the previously underappreciated value of women’s fan fiction writing as a recruiting ground for new talent and as a source for new creative material. Yet, for all this focus on engaged audiences, does the industry value some form of viewers and viewership more than others? Which groups are being underrepresented here and why? Are the new economic arrangements between fans and producers fair to all involved?

Panelists:
Ivan Askwith – Lead strategist, “Veronica Mars” Kickstarter Campaign
Vicky L. Free – Chief marketing officer, BET Networks
Nick Loeffler – Director of business development, Kindle Worlds
Stacey Lynn Schulman – Senior vice president, chief research officer, Television Bureau of Advertising
Sharon L. Strover – Professor, College of Communication, University of Texas at Austin

Moderator:
Henry Jenkins – Co-director, Transforming Hollywood / provost professor of Communication, Journalism, Cinematic Arts and Education, USC Annenberg School for Communication

via Transforming Hollywood: The Future of Television Conference Videos (Part One)

EVE, offline: how do you archive a universe? | The Verge

The difficulty of capturing ephemeral moments is felt deeply in video game archival work. „Preserving Virtual Worlds,“ a landmark paper and project in the field, uses the example of virtual candlelight vigils held in Asheron’s Call and Everquest after the September 11th attacks. One version of a single-player game can stay more or less the same over the years, but these moments were as fleeting as their real-world counterparts — and unlike those, there are no physical relics left behind. If EVE Online somehow manages to keep running into the next century, it won’t be the same game it was in 2013. Even going back 10 years is a struggle: in the early days, Ólafsson says, CCP had to overwrite older data to keep from running out of server space. Today, the company keeps a huge archive, of which MoMA currently has only a fragment.

EVE, offline: how do you archive a universe? | Adi Robertson, The Verge

The Shapes of Stories, a Kurt Vonnegut Infographic | Maya Eilam

vonngeut-stories-infographic

The Shapes of Stories, a Kurt Vonnegut Infographic | Maya Eilam

My take on visually presenting Kurt Vonnegut’s theories about archetypal stories, designed after researching the subject. Prints are available on my shop on Etsy.

How Criterion Collection Brings Movies Back From the Dead on Vimeo

via GIZMODO – How Criterion Collection Brings Movies Back From the Dead on Vimeo.

Journal of Games Criticism

Journal of Games Criticism

We take video games as our impetus and our enterprise. With multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity as our tools, we look to the past of video gaming in order to orchestrate and build its future. Looking to rhetoric, media studies, and cultural studies, many apparatuses of analysis are present, but they all must be brought into these media and reborn.

[in]Transition | a mediaCommons project

[in]Transition | a mediaCommons project

[in]Transition […] is the first peer-reviewed academic journal of videographic film and moving image studies.

Practitioners of these forms (which include, inter alia, the ‘video essay’, ‘audiovisual essay’, and ‘visual essay’ formats) explore the ways in which digital technologies afford a new mode of carrying out and presenting film and moving image research.

Visualization of Narrative

Visualization of Narrative

We visualized character interactions and relative emotional content for three very different books: a haunting memory play, a metaphysical mood piece, and a children’s fantasy classic. A dynamic graph of character relationships displays the evolution of connections between characters throughout the book. Emotional strength and valence of each sentence are shown in a color-coded sentiment plot.

Alan Moore on Superheroes

The subject of comic-related-films (or film-related-comics) had understandably arisen and, when asked, I had ventured my honest opinion that I found something worrying about the fact that the superhero film audience was now almost entirely composed of adults, men and women in their thirties, forties and fifties who were eagerly lining up to watch characters and situations that had been expressly created to entertain the twelve year-old boys of fifty years ago. […] It looks to me very much like a significant section of the public, having given up on attempting to understand the reality they are actually living in, have instead reasoned that they might at least be able to comprehend the sprawling, meaningless, but at-least-still-finite ‘universes’ presented by DC or Marvel Comics. I would also observe that it is, potentially, culturally catastrophic to have the ephemera of a previous century squatting possessively on the cultural stage and refusing to allow this surely unprecedented era to develop a culture of its own, relevant and sufficient to its times.

Last Alan Moore Interview? | Pádraig Ó Méalóid AKA Slovobooks