What happens at the World Economic Forum in Davos? : The New Yorker

The stratification begins with the badges. Every participant wears a badge on a lanyard. Every encounter begins with an unabashed glance or two down at the other’s badge. It is Davos Man’s defining gesture. So frequently did gazes slip to reëxamine my badge that I came to know what it must be like to have cleavage. The color of the badge denotes a role, and a degree of access. W.E.F. staff wear blue badges—dark blue for full time and light for temps. “Reporting Press” wear orange and can’t get in a lot of places. Entourages get mint green. The coveted pass is the white one, granting delegates free rein. There are variations: A Strategic Partner gets a blue dot and access to an exclusive lounge. A special hologram used to signal membership in an élite faction called the Informal Gathering of World Economic Leaders, or IGWEL, but now “serves boring logistical purposes,” according to Monck. I was given a white badge, which meant I’d been knighted a Media Leader. Media Leaders may trump Reporting Press (ha!), but they bow before the Media Governors (curses!), who get invited to the off-the-record sit-downs with Geithner and Merkel.

What happens at the World Economic Forum in Davos? : The New Yorker

Inventing the Digital Medium: An Interview with Janet Murray (Part One)

The cultural task I have in mind is meaning-making. I think this is the same task that babies undertake and early humans must have undertaken in clapping hands in imitation of one another, in pointing to something to direct attention to it, in intentionally clapping hands in synchrony with another person. These are the the radical cultural primitives, and language, drawing, writing, print, photography, and now computation are all ways of expanding our ability to clap, to point, to think together and synchronize our minds and our behaviors.

via  Inventing the Digital Medium: An Interview with Janet Murray (Part One).

Raymond Johnson – Google+ – I found this on my office chalkboard this morning, thanks…

Raymond Johnson – Google+ – I found this on my office chalkboard this morning, thanks….

This reminds me of bad survey design decisions.

Experience Maps Identify Inefficiencies and Opportunities

Experience Maps Identify Inefficiencies and Opportunities

An experience map is a holistic view of all of the touchpoints or interactions people have with a brand. It enables you to determine a number of key factors:

Offene Daten Berlin

Offene Daten Berlin

Im Berliner Datenportal stellt das Land Berlin Datensätze der öffentlichen Verwaltung zur Verfügung. So soll Verwaltungsmitarbeitern, Bürgern, Unternehmen und Wissenschaftlern die Möglichkeit gegeben werden, über einen zentralen Einstiegspunkt auf Daten und Informationen der Berliner Verwaltung zuzugreifen und diese weiterzuverwenden, so dass durch neue Ideen sowie Kombination und Analyse neue Erkenntnisse aus den vorhandenen Daten gewonnen werden können.

The Secret Language Code

Basically, we discovered that in any interaction, the person with the higher status uses I-words less (yes, less) than people who are low in status. […] When undergraduates wrote me, their emails were littered with I, me, and my. My response, although quite friendly, was remarkably detached — hardly an I-word graced the page. And then I analyzed my emails to the dean of my college. My emails looked like an I-word salad; his emails back to me were practically I-word free.

James Pennebaker – The Secret Language Code

„Isn’t sociology just the study of the painfully obvious?“‬‏

YouTube – ‪Ask Dalton Conley: „Isn’t sociology just the study of the painfully obvious?“‬‏

Download – Goffman-Poster | Criminologia

Download – Goffman-Poster by Criminologia.de – http://criminologia.de.

datacatalogs.org

datacatalogs.org

DataCatalogs.org aims to be the most comprehensive list of open data catalogs in the world. It is curated by a group of leading open data experts from around the world – including representatives from local, regional and national governments, international organisations such as the World Bank, and numerous NGOs.