Franz Joseph and Star Trek’s Blueprint Culture | Graphic Engine

Drafting the technical manual and ship blueprints was, then, largely a matter of reconciling the “imaginary” object of the Enterprise miniature with the “real” object of sets such as the bridge, sickbay, and engineering, explaining in graphic form how exterior and interior aspects of the Enterprise fit together into a coherent whole. In this sense, Joseph’s work might be described as operationalizing the Kuleshov effect, tying down and standardizing relationships created through editing. The technical materials upon which design-oriented fandom thrives – blueprints, models, hand-crafted props –thus serve an essentially conservative function, knitting together loose seams of an imperfectly-manufactured diegetic reality, as opposed to the exploding/perverting of officially preferred meanings that occurs in fan fiction (particularly slash).

http://graphic-engine.swarthmore.edu/?p=1602

Sunday Links for 2009-06-14

Sunday links:

  • Top Chef and the Black/Non-Black Divide: How racial stereotypes are reproduced in cooking shows. If this doesn’t open your eyes, nothing will [Link]
  • Henry Jenkins discusses his concept of Transmedia Storytelling in this video [Link]
  • Text, Videos, Twitter Streams: Vooks and Transmedia Resistance [Link]
  • How Twitter Constructs Star Authenticity [Link]
  • The Technium on Increasing Ubiquity [Link]
  • OOOii: Immersive Design for Science Fiction Movies [Link]
  • Star Trek TNG remixed [Link]

Sunday links: Science, Lost, Star Trek, What makes us happy?

Sunday Links:

  • The most realistic and the most ridiculous uses of science in film and TV [Link]
  • Lost and Literature: A Transmedia Story [Link]
  • An article about one of the most comprehensive longitudinal studies in history with some fascinating insights: What makes us happy? [Link]
  • Henry Jenkins: Five ways to start a conversation about the new Star Trek film [Link]