TMH5, Panel Three: Second Screens, Connected Viewing, Crowd-funding and Social Media: Re-imagining Television Consumption on Vimeo

TMH5, Panel Three: Second Screens, Connected Viewing, Crowd-funding and Social Media: Re-imagining Television Consumption on Vimeo on Vimeo

As the television industry has been remapping the flow of media content, as new forms of producers and distributors enter the marketplace, there has also been an accompanying effort to rethink their interface with media audiences. Over the past decade, we’ve seen a renewed emphasis on audience engagement strategies which seek to ensure consumer loyalty and social buzz as a way for individual programs or networks to “break through the clutter” of the multiplying array of media options. New metrics are emerging for measuring the value of engaged viewers and the kinds of social and cultural capital they bring with them when they embrace a program. So, for example, the rise of Black Twitter has been credited with helping to rally support behind new programs with strong black protagonists, such as ABC’s “Scandal,” Fox’s “Sleepy Hollow” and BET’s “Being Mary Jane.” Second-screen apps are becoming ubiquitous as television producers seek to hold onto the attention of a generation of viewers who are prone to multitasking impulses. The successful “Veronica Mars” Kickstarter campaign opens up the prospect of fans helping to provide funding in support of their favorite stars, creators or series. And the commercial success of “50 Shades of Grey,” which was adapted from a piece of “Twilight” fan fiction, has alerted the publishing world to the previously underappreciated value of women’s fan fiction writing as a recruiting ground for new talent and as a source for new creative material. Yet, for all this focus on engaged audiences, does the industry value some form of viewers and viewership more than others? Which groups are being underrepresented here and why? Are the new economic arrangements between fans and producers fair to all involved?

Panelists:
Ivan Askwith – Lead strategist, “Veronica Mars” Kickstarter Campaign
Vicky L. Free – Chief marketing officer, BET Networks
Nick Loeffler – Director of business development, Kindle Worlds
Stacey Lynn Schulman – Senior vice president, chief research officer, Television Bureau of Advertising
Sharon L. Strover – Professor, College of Communication, University of Texas at Austin

Moderator:
Henry Jenkins – Co-director, Transforming Hollywood / provost professor of Communication, Journalism, Cinematic Arts and Education, USC Annenberg School for Communication

via Transforming Hollywood: The Future of Television Conference Videos (Part One)

Innovation Summit 2013: The Future of Television

Innovation Summit 2013: The Future of Television on Vimeo. Also see Is This the End of Television As We Know It? from Henry Jenkins.

Transmedia Storytelling: Creating Worlds with Fans

Transmedia Storytelling from Ginaluca Fiorelli.

A brief history of transmedia world building

A brief history of transmedia world building from Jeff Watson

Outlines history of transmedia „world-building“ in a variety of contexts, from religion to contemporary art practice. Prepared for a student seminar at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts.

Transmedia Storytelling in Television 2.0

In the era of convergence, television producers are developing transmedia narratives to cater to consumers who are willing to follow their favorite shows across multiple media channels. At the same time, there still remains a need to preserve an internally coherent television show for more traditional viewers. This thesis offers a model for how transmedia storytelling can coexist with and enhance a television narrative, using Lost as a case study. By building a world to be discovered, creating a hierarchy of strategic gaps, focusing on the unique capabilities of each extension, and using the “validation effect” to reward fans for their cross-media traversals, television/transmedia producers can provide a satisfying experience for hard-core and casual fans alike.

Transmedia Storytelling in Television 2.0 by Aaron Smith, 2009

Storytelling Part 1: Change of Storytelling on Vimeo

Thoughts about the presence and future of storytelling from several media scholars from around the world. It’s the first one in a series by ith storytelling.

Primer: Transmedia Storytelling and Alternate Reality Games

Transmedia Storytelling and Alternate Reality Games: A primer for non-specialist audiences.

Monday – 20th July 2009 @ 09:42:01 AM

Henry Jenkins on Transmedia – November 2009 from niko on Vimeo.

Henry Jenkins is the director, Comparative Media Studies Program at MIT. In this viral-info-snack he discusses the power of media in a 21 century trans-mediated world. A world where converging technologies and cultures give rise to a new media landscape.

Sunday Links for 2009-06-14

Sunday links:

  • Top Chef and the Black/Non-Black Divide: How racial stereotypes are reproduced in cooking shows. If this doesn’t open your eyes, nothing will [Link]
  • Henry Jenkins discusses his concept of Transmedia Storytelling in this video [Link]
  • Text, Videos, Twitter Streams: Vooks and Transmedia Resistance [Link]
  • How Twitter Constructs Star Authenticity [Link]
  • The Technium on Increasing Ubiquity [Link]
  • OOOii: Immersive Design for Science Fiction Movies [Link]
  • Star Trek TNG remixed [Link]