The Levitz Grid

Paul Levitz probably thought about what a comic book writer does more than any of his contemporaries, or mine, and during his dozen-plus-years stint as writer of The Legion of Super-Heroes, systematized what his predecessors did haphazardly, if at all. Then, as an aid to his own work, he created three versions of the Levitz Grid [] Basically, the procedure is this: The writer has two, three, or even four plots going at once. The main plot—call it Plot A—occupies most of the pages and the characters‘ energies. The secondary plot—Plot B—functions as a subplot. Plot C and Plot D, if any, are given minimum space and attention—a few panels. As Plot A concludes, Plot B is „promoted“; it becomes Plot A, and Plot C becomes Plot B, and so forth. Thus, there is a constant upward plot progression; each plot develops in interest and complexity as the year’s issues appear.

Quelle: Serious comics writing post: how can teh Internet be so jam packed with my fe…

Additionally check out The Levitz Paradigm: „The best imitation of life possible in a work of fiction“

Parting Shot: Jonathan Hickman’s Graphtacular ‘Fantastic Four’ Outline

Parting Shot: Jonathan Hickman’s Graphtacular ‘Fantastic Four’ Outline

[T]he various plotlines as they progress through 30 issues of Fantastic Four.

These Maps Reveal the Hidden Structures of ‚Choose Your Own Adventure‘ Books

In By Balloon to the Sahara, you’re in a balloon and are presented with a choice on the very first page. Storm clouds are on the horizon. Choice 1: “If you act now, you can release gas from the balloon and land before the storm overtakes you.” Choice 2: “Perhaps the storm will pass quickly. Maybe you can ride it out.” That’s just the beginning, since this book has the most decision points—48—of the series.

Quelle: These Maps Reveal the Hidden Structures of ‚Choose Your Own Adventure‘ Books

Medieval Fantasy City Generator by watabou

Medieval Fantasy City Generator by watabou

This application generates a random medieval city layout of a requested size. The generation method is rather arbitrary, the goal is to produce a nice looking map, not an accurate model of a city.

Vulgar: Language generator

Vulgar: Language generator

Vulgar is a constructed language (conlang) generator for fantasy fiction writing that creates unique and usable constructed languages in the click of a button. Vulgar’s output models the regularities, irregularities and quirks of real world languages; phonology, grammar, and a 2000 unique word vocabulary.

OldMapsOnline

OldMapsOnline

OldMapsOnline developed out of a love of history and heritage of old maps. The project began as a collaboration between Klokan Technologies GmbH, Switzerland and The Great Britain Historical GIS Project based at the University of Portsmouth, UK […] Since January 2013 is the project improved and maintained by volunteers and the team of Klokan Technologies GmbH in their free time. […] OldMapsOnline.org indexes over 400.000 maps. This is only thanks to the archives and libraries that were open to the idea and provided their online content. All new participants are warmly welcomed.

The Tommy Westphall Universe

The Tommy Westphall Universe

Tommy Westphall was an austistic child on the TV series St Elsewhere who, it was revealed in the closing moments of the final episode of that series, had dreamt the entire run of the show. […] St Elsewhere has direct connections to twelve other television series – many of them direct crossovers of character to and from the series. Others make mention of specific parts of the St Elsewhere fictional universe, placing them within the same fictional sphere.

Open (World) Peer Review: Leveling a Lowbie PhD Thesis

Video game archaeology perhaps is the first example of a new New Archaeology, one that is post-material and post-human, one that not only intersects past and present, but that also uses the screen as the sole method of accessing new archaeological spaces. These spaces are made by people (or by machine) for other people to use, and are invested with creativity and examples of material culture. They are kinetic and also kinesthetic. They contain their own space-time. Each game is its own discrete entity, its own site. At the same time, each game exists in multiple, identical copies, circumventing the problem of the “unrepeatable experiment” of total excavation. They pose both classic and new questions to the archaeologist who operates in both the real and the virtual simultaneously using very real archaeological craft.

Andrew Reinhard, Open (World) Peer Review: Leveling a Lowbie PhD Thesis | Archaeogaming

Maniac Mansion Design Notes

A early mock-up of the Maniac Mansion UI, which would influence many later Lucasfilm adventure games.

A map of the mansion, interestingly the limited disk space of 320k played a big role in the mansion size and layout.

Source: Grumpy Gamer – Maniac Mansion Design Notes

Generating fantasy maps

Generating fantasy maps

Make maps that look like something you’d find at the back of cheap paperback fantasy novels.